The Yelp! of apps & extensions

Edshelf is a constantly-updated directory of apps and extensions that is organized by grade level, academic subject, or task (presentations, flashcards, augmented reality, etc.). You’ll get reviews of the apps from educators (which is why I likened it to Yelp!) – and the reviews contain useful information, like whether you need to pay money to use apps, or how easy/hard the learning curve is. There are also “shelves” where people curate their lists of apps, so if you find a like-minded teacher, you can follow him. It’s very user friendly – check it out!

Seven tips to get into the fighting spirit!

  • Check out Google Cast. Students can add this app from the Chrome Web Store, and when prompted by the teacher, project wirelessly from his or her device. I haven’t tried it here at school, as it’s fairly new, but here’s an article by a teacher who did. A post from an EdTech site explains the process step by step. If you try it (or would like help trying it), please let me know!

Continue reading “Seven tips to get into the fighting spirit!”

9.14.15

I don’t like that my conversations with people in Gmail are “threaded” – or all lumped together into one huge email. I want to see each individual email in my inbox. I can delete them on my own if it gets to be too much. How can I fix that?

Read this post from the website called Tech for Luddites and find your answer! (I feel like former English department member Pamela Mueller would love this website name.)

Would you like to be globally fancy?

Thursday is Global Collaboration Day, and several teachers here at CCHS are participating with their classes. If you’d like to take part as an educator, consider joining me at 3:00 in room 401 where I’ll be “attending” a webinar: Real EdTech Implementation: Crowd-Sourced Lessons For Differentiated Instruction. Just bring a set of headphones.

Take a minute to consider apps and extensions.
  • Still not sure what the difference is between an App and an Extension? Read about it here.
  • Here’s an article about 20 Google Apps you can use in your classroom to get students collaborating and creating immediately.
  • Alice Keeler just added five more extensions to her gigantic, massive, crazy list of “Chrome Extensions for Teachers.” I have the list cataloged on my page here.
Speaking of apps and extensions…
  • I’m compiling a list of apps and extensions available to the students in our Chrome web store. I’ll make it available to them, too. Here it is (not in its final form – I will eventually have Chrome store links for each app).
  • In order for an app to be available for students, a teacher must request it, or a student can request it – there is a link for students to fill out a request on the front of their Chromebook Handbook.
  • And if you haven’t looked through the two student slideshows I put on the front of their Chromebook Handbook, you might want to – the information I gave them in these presentations is fresh – it doesn’t necessarily overlap with the information I’ve been giving you here! 🙂

8.24.15

I’m ready to learn more about Google Classroom. Where should I start?
  • I mean, yeah, there’s the great Google Classroom resource page I put together right up there at the top of this site. But take a look at Alice Keeler’s collection of entries. She is truly the master!
Has anyone ever thought about the PE Department?
  • Why yes! This PE teacher certainly has! Not only does he run a great blog about teaching PE, he did this year-end roundup at the end of 2014 that points to all sorts of resources that you may want to read and bookmark!
But what about the Math Department?
  • Look at this list from the aforementioned Alice Keeler, just for you. It’s bananas!
You know what sounds good to me? A gigantic list of education blogs.
Can you recommend any cool extensions for Chrome?
  • Look at this list from the aforementioned Alice Keeler. I know, I’m getting a little one-note with her. But wow. (What is the difference between an app and an extension? I have a little write-up on that here!)